Our Resistance Recess Toolkit Has Lots of Ideas and Resources to Take Action This August Recess!

August 8: We did it! Through people power, we killed the efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act! At least for now, and just by one vote. We have lots of work ahead of us.

All members of Congress are home for the August recess. They’ll be in district hosting town halls, public events, and meeting with their constituents. When they come back in September, they’ll be voting on a number of pieces of legislation, as well as the federal budget. The Republican fight to dismantle the social safety net, including health care, funding for Medicaid and food stamps, is not over. Will you take the pledge to be active during #ResistanceRecess to #ProtectOurCare and the #HIVBudget?  

To help you plan your next steps, check out our brand-new, hot-off-the-presses Resistance Recess Toolkit. Use it and share with your friends and fellow activists!

Shyronn Perdue 4
Shyronn Jones, PWN-USA Policy Fellow, visits GA Sen. David Purdue’s office

PWN-USA and SERO Project Announce 2018 HIV Is Not a Crime National Training Academy in Indianapolis

         sero_pwn_cropFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Ken Pinkela: ken.pinkela@seroproject.com or Jennie Smith-Camejo: jsmithcamejo@pwn-usa.org

May 15, 2017:  Building on the amazing success of the HIV Is Not a Crime II National Training Academy last year, the SERO Project and Positive Women’s Network-USA are pleased to announce that the planning process is underway for the third HIV Is Not a Crime National Training Academy to support repeal or modernization of laws criminalizing the alleged non-disclosure, perceived or potential exposure or transmission of HIV. The training academy will be held at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) June 3-6, 2018.

Continue reading “PWN-USA and SERO Project Announce 2018 HIV Is Not a Crime National Training Academy in Indianapolis”

PWN-USA Gets Ready to SPEAK UP!

PrintSeptember 19, 2016 – It’s hard to believe, but we’re only about a week away from SPEAK UP! 2016 National Leadership Summit for Women Living with HIV. We’d like to thank our dedicated Summit Planning Committee for their many hours of time and energy spent planning this Summit to be the best yet!

We look forward to welcoming over 250 women living with HIV to Fort Walton Beach next week. Some are seasoned advocates who have long been involved with PWN-USA and who attended SPEAK UP! 2014; for others, this may be the first conference ever, and an introduction to advocacy. We welcome both and everyone in between, regardless of your experience with advocacy.

To help orient participants to the Summit, we have scheduled two special orientation webinars for registered participants for this week! Click on a day/time below to register for that webinar. If you cannot participate in either webinar, a recording will be available on our website by the end of the week.

Tuesday, September 20, 6 PM EDT/5 PM CDT/4 PM MDT/3 PM PDT

Thursday, September 22, 12 PM EDT/11 AM CDT/10 AM MDT/9 AM PDT

cover-art-final-2We also have the complete program available right here on our website now! Check it out here.

We have put together some travel tips for you as well! Questions about what you should bring? What your registration fee does and doesn’t cover? Find answers here.

We would love to hear your thoughts, feelings and expectations as you get ready for the Summit and throughout the Summit! Write a blog for us! Get started here.

We look forward to seeing you next week!

 

 

Five Weeks Until Huntsville! Register NOW for the HIV Is Not a Crime II National Training Academy

HIV_not_a_crime II smallApril 11, 2016: The HIV is Not a Crime II Training Academy will be held at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, May 17 – 20, 2016 – you can still register to be part of this transformative advocacy training experience!

Join co-organizers PositiveWomen’s Network – USA (PWN-USA) and the SEROProject — two networks of people living with HIV – and help build a diverse, intersectional movement against HIV criminalization in the South and across the United States.

Plenary and session topics will include:

  • ·      Intersections of race, gender and sexuality in HIV criminalization
  • ·      Centering the rights of sex workers and other over-criminalized groups
  • ·      Updates and tips from active state-based campaigns against HIV criminalization
  • ·      Supporting leadership of people living with HIV in the movement to end HIV criminalization

HIV is a human rights issue; criminalization of people living with HIV is a social justice issue. The Training Academy will unite and train advocates living with HIV and allies from across the country on strategies and best practices for repealing laws criminalizing people living with and vulnerable to HIV.

Heinous violations of the rights of people living with HIV like the recent, active case of Corey Rangel in Michigan are made possible by a landscape in which laws are on the books making it a crime to live with a health condition. Come to Huntsville and learnstrategies from advocates opposing these unjust laws!

The training academy will convene in the Deep South — the region most heavily affected by not only HIV, but many other symptoms of a history steeped in injustice and trauma.

Register for HIV Is Not a Crime II TODAY! 

There’s also still time for your organization to become a sponsor of the training academy, and/or send a participant to this important event. For more information, please contact Sean Strub, SERO Project, at sean.strub@SEROproject.com; or Naina Khanna, PWN-USA, at nkhanna@pwn-usa.org.

Questions? Please contact Tami Haught, SERO Organizer and Training Coordinator, at: tami.haught@SEROproject.com.

Stay tuned to the training academy’s website and social media for more information as the event approaches.

www.HIVIsNotaCrime.com
Twitter: @HIVIsNotaCrime
Facebook: /HIVIsNotaCrimeConference
#HIVIsNotaCrime

HINAC countdown memes 1 spitting

“We Gonna Be Alright”: An HIV Activist at the 1st National Movement for Black Lives Convening

By Waheedah Shabazz-El, PWN-USA Director of Regional Organizing

 

Introduction

Waheedah Shabazz-El.
Waheedah Shabazz-El.

“Unapologetically Black” was a major theme amongst more than 1,500 Black activists and organizers in attendance at the 1st National Movement for Black Lives Convening, held July 24-26, 2015, in Cleveland, Ohio, at Cleveland State University. I arrived of course as a Stakeholder and an HIV Activist representing PWN-USA, Philadelphia FIGHT, and HIV Prevention Justice Alliance (HIV PJA) — intent on helping to shape the landscape of the new Black Movement through identifying critical intersectional opportunities for movement building. Highlighting the implications of HIV Criminalization Laws and how they tear at the very fiber of the Black Community.

Something else happened for me as I disembarked the transit bus and approached Cleveland State University, something rather enchanting. I was eagerly greeted by young adults whom I had never seen or known, with unforeseen energy of reverence, respect, and appreciation. Warm smiles, head nods, door holding, bag reaching; along with verbal salutations of “good morning beautiful,” “good morning Black woman,” “good morning sister,” and “Black Love.” All this just for showing up, just for being there, just for being Black.

I soon realized there was another transformation going on here, because in my mind I was arriving as this “kick ass activist.” However, I was being seen and greeted through a prism of unanticipated reverence. I was being greeted as an elder — a tribal elder. Yes I showed up. Yes I was there. Of course I was Black – but beyond that, I was being bestowed the honorable identification as a Black Tribal Elder. A Black Tribal Elder who (now in my mind) had been summoned here to help shape the foundation for real Black Liberation.

Each person that greeted me was cheerful, kind, and jovial, yet maintained an unspoken seriousness which I came to understand to be a greeting from a deeper place inside each of us. It was utterly amazing. Our spirits were meeting, touching, embracing, and speaking in unison, saying to each other: “We are here to be free.

 

Day One, July 24

Waheedah with PWN-USA-Ohio Co-Chair Naimah Oneal.
Waheedah with PWN-USA-Ohio Co-Chair Naimah Oneal.

Day One of the conference and I was already hyped. Feeling grand and safe and appreciated, it was time to get down to work. Registration was seamless (since folks at the front of line called my name); then we were off to the opening ceremony. Greetings, salutations and introductions of the founders of the movement, local leaders and honoring of family members of young lives taken much too soon. The highlight of the opening ceremony for me was when Black Lives Matter cofounder Alicia Garza took us on a poetic history journey honoring the city of Cleveland for their leadership in the history of the Black struggle: From Ohio’s long and rich history as a hotbed of Underground Railroad activity to the 1964 Cleveland schools’ boycott to protest segregation to the 1st National Movement for Black Lives Convening.

The panel connecting HIV to the Movement for Black Lives was next and entitled “The Black Side of the Red Ribbon.” Panelists Kenyon Farrow, Deon Haywood, “young” Maxx Boykin from HIV PJA, and myself were given the opportunity to bring Black AIDS Activism into perspective and shared our motivation and years of experience working alongside (the Black side) of other community members in the fight to address the HIV dilemma and the stigma surrounding it.

Later that evening, July 24, we were addressed as a mass assembly by several of the recent families who have lost loved ones to police brutality and state violence. Family members of Eric Garner, Rekia Boyd, Trayvon Martin, Mike Brown, and Tamir Rice and Tanisha Anderson — both local victims of police murder. There was also cousin of the late Emmett Till.

 

Day Two, July 25

Day Two was more of the same “Black Love,” “good morning Black Man” and an opening plenary, yet something a bit different occurred. The Movement for Black Lives made its first essential internal transformation without any resistance. The challenge was eloquently articulated by a delegation of transgender and gender-variant participants who were invited to the stage: “The Movement for Black Lives must be a safe place for all, and inclusive of all gender identities and sexual expressions.”

The delegation introduced a list of logistic challenges that were overlooked, which included: an application with more than two gender choices; trans*-related workshops spread out on the schedule and not all in the same time slot; conference badges that allowed preferred name and pronoun preferences; and use of gender-neutral restrooms. In addition, the delegation offered some “not-so-gender-specific” language. Instead of referring to one another as brother and/or sister, we could use the word “Sib” (short for sibling) a more inclusive term. On the website, the Movement for Black Lives Mass Convening was framed as a space and time that would be used to “build a sense of fellowship that transcends geographical boundaries, and begin to heal from the many traumas we face.” So the transformation is to build a sense of siblingship, instead of fellowship.

Waheedah and panelists at "HIV Is Not a Crime, Or Is It?"
Waheedah and panelists at “HIV Is Not a Crime, Or Is It?”

“HIV Is Not a Crime, Or Is It” was the title of the panel I participated in later in the afternoon on Day Two, and it was a blast – aka a huge success. An expert panel with Marsha Jones, Kenyon Farrow, Bryan Jones, and I fiercely articulated how HIV Criminalization laws disproportionately affect and break down the very fiber of Black Community: their implications on Black Women, their children and Young Black Gay Men, and the impact the laws were having on public health within our Black Community.

 

Day Three, July 26

In the closing strategy sessions, HIV criminalization was kept on the agenda of the Movement for Black Lives. Ending HIV is a must and it will take a movement, not a moment, to take on the issue of ending yet another way of policing Black communities – this time through legal discrimination of people living with HIV.

All in all, the Movement for Black Lives was a gathering where we connected to Black love, Black leadership and Black power, Black culture, Black art, and the Black aesthetic in music. The convening included an amazing workshop on “Building Black Women’s Leadership.” The Movement for Black Lives’ journey continues as we commit our energy toward deepening and broadening the connections that were made at the convening. Again: It’s a Movement not a moment.

Black women, Black men, Black youth, Black elders, Black artists, Black straight people, Black queer people, Black trans* people, Black labor, Black Muslims, Black Christians, and Black Panthers. We laughed together. We cried together, and cheered for one another. We challenged each other and shared life experiences. We shared resources, studied together, and created new networks. We debated. We danced. We chanted. We partied together. We healed. I left there pumped with pride, chanting continuously in my head:

I

I believe

I believe that

I believe that we

I believe that we will

I believe that we will win! And #wegonnabealright.

 

Waheedah Shabazz-El is a founding member of PWN-USA and serves as PWN-USA’s Regional Organizing Director. She is based in Philadelphia.

#HIVisNOTaCrime in Texas or Anywhere: Urgent Help Request

This piece is adapted from a version originally posted on Advocacy Without Borders’ blog.
WE NEED YOUR HELP. BADLY.
I have written before about HIV criminalization, here and here. Most recently, though, when I have written about it I have shared how it is currently affecting my state, Texas and I have also shared about a collaborative call where the problem and an action plan was discussed. Now I am talking about it again. Because what many of us consider our worst nightmare has come to pass.

Senate Bill 779 has been moved out of the Texas State Affairs Committee and assigned to the Criminal Jurisprudence Committee.  With only two weeks left in the state legislative period – which will not occur again until 2017. That is NOT good news…as I have written previously:


“…the state of Texas is on the verge of taking a gigantic leap backward. There is a state bill, Senate Bill 779, that proposes to amend the state Health  and Safety Code to allow for HIV test results (which are currently confidential) to be subpoenaed during grand jury proceedings –  and for a defendant’s medical records to be accessed without their consent to establish guilt/innocence and also potentially to be used to determine sentencing. Essentially, this bill proposes to criminalize having HIV.”



We MUST oppose this. And we need YOUR help, whether you 
have HIV or not! This is a human rights issue. We need YOU to
stand with us, PLEASE!!!
The following text of the post derived in its entirety from the Texas HIV/AIDS Coalition (thank you, Venita!); republishing here for easier sharing. Please help now!!!
 
Senate Bill 779 Talking Points
 
“Senate Bill 779, introduced by Sen Joan Huffman, would remove the confidential nature of HIV test results and allow them to be used as evidence in a criminal proceeding.  SB 779 is targeted solely at people living with HIV as stated by the Sen. Huffman in the Senate State Affairs Committee when the bill was introducedSB 779 was passed by the Senate and has now been assigned to the House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee.  We need your help defeating this bill! Please call and email the members of the committee listed below. We also need folks willing to travel to Austin to testify against this harmful bill in the next two weeks. 

SB 779 is bad for the estimated 76,000 Texans living with HIV and for Texas for the following reasons:
1. Using HIV test results in any criminal prosecution makes it appear that HIV is the crime rather than the actual crime being investigated. We need public health solutions to fight HIV and not criminal prosecutions.
 
2. Criminalizing people because they are HIV positive continues to perpetuate fear, stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV.  Texas does not have an HIV specific criminal statute. Prosecutors should charge the actual crime and not the health status!
 
3. Treating a medical condition as evidence of a crime is at direct odds with public health campaigns to get as many people as possible tested and, if HIV positive, into treatment. Tests results can’t be used against you if you don’t get tested. 
 
4. There is no evidence that HIV related prosecutions increase disclosure, reduce the spread of HIV or deter the rare acts of intentional transmission.
 
5. Laws should reinforce science-based public health messages.  SB 779 could also be applied against persons charged with crimes involving spitting and biting. There is simply no need to prosecute someone for attempting to transmit HIV through spitting or biting, because that is not how HIV is transmitted.
 
6. It violates the privacy rights of people living with HIV by permitting confidential medical information to be used in a criminal proceeding.  Issuing a protective order at later stage does not prevent the violation of privacy. 
 
7. HIV is a chronically manageable disease and should not be treated as a deadly weapon. Defining HIV as a deadly weapon further stigmatizes the disease and those living with it. 
 
8. Although the bill is supposed to target cases of intentional transmission; it is overbroad and would apply to any person living with HIV involved in a criminal prosecution.  

Texas House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee Members
Chair – Rep. Abel Herrero (District 34 – Nueces)
Vice Chair – Rep. Joe Moody (District 78 – El Paso)
Rep. Terry Canales (District 40 – Hidalgo)
Rep. Todd Hunter (District 32- Nueces)
Rep. Jeff Leach (District 67 – Collin)
Rep. Matt Shaheen (District 66 – Collin)
512-463-1021
Rep. David Simpson (District 7 – Longview)
512-463-0750
Thank you.”
Here is a direct link to the committee page with all of the members’ contact info also (thanks Kristopher).
_________________________________________________
Sample Tweets You Can Send Out for #SB779 Advocacy
(*Be sure to include the Twitter handles of the members above!!!)
Ppl living w/#HIV deserve the same privacy as anyone else; vote NO on #SB779! #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
 
#SB779 violates the privacy & dignity of ppl w/#HIV! #TXHIV #texlege #HIVisnotacrime
 
#HIV does NOT = less than! #SB779 says otherwise. #TXHIV #texlege #HIVisnotacrime
 
#SB779 is a HUGE step BACKWARDS for #TX; oppose it! #texlege #TXHIV #HIV #HIVisnotacrime
 
 
#SB779 poses a #publichealth problem not just for ppl w/#HIV, but 4 ALL of #TX.  #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
 
 
#HIVisnotacrime, but #SB779 treats it as such. Oppose this unfair bill! #texlege #TXHIV #HIV
 
#TX does NOT need #SB779 to create more #HIV stigma & fear; vote NO! #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
 
#HIPAA exists 4 a reason; #SB779 violates privacy & should not pass in #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime #HIV
Texans w/#HIV are NOT 2nd class citizens; oppose #SB779 now! #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
#Publichealth concerns need public health solutions, NOT criminal penalties! #SB779 #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime #HIV
#HIV should be treated the same way we treat other communicable diseases; say NO to #SB779. #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
If #SB779 passes, we will lose years of progress made w/#HIV testing & treatment. #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
#SB779 invades privacy & criminalizes #HIV. #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
#HIV+ Texans have a right to the same privacy as Texans w/out HIV. #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
#Creating fear & shame will NOT help us #Get2Zero new #HIV cases in #TX. OPPOSE #SB779! #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
#HIV tests are private & only the person tested should reveal their test results; NO to #SB779. #texlege #TXHIV #HIVisnotacrime
Pls don’t penalize tens of thousands of law abiding Texans w/#HIV for the actions of a few; OPPOSE #SB779! #HIVisNOTacrime
oppose_sb779
Photo credit: Kristopher Sharp

One Ounce of Truth: The Collective Power of AIDSWatch 2015

By Susan Mull

Nikki Giovanni wrote a poem called “The New Yorkers.” This is the beginning of that poem:

“In front of the bank building after six o’clock the gathering of the bag people begins. In cold weather they huddle around. When it is freezing they get cardboard boxes.”*

Susan Mull.
Susan Mull.

Stop! I immediately thought of HOPWA (Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS) and the truth we were striving to share with members of Congress on April 14, 2015. Four hundred advocates from thirty states and Puerto Rico were about to converge on Capitol Hill as part of AIDSWatch 2015. One of my peers said, “You cannot stay adherent to medications if you are homeless.” Another said, ”There are currently fifty thousand households served by HOPWA while 1.2 million people in America live with HIV.”

We had so many issues to bring to the attention of Congresspeople. These are some of the issues:

1) there are fifty thousand new HIV infections each year;

2) young people under the age of twenty-five accounted for one in five new infections in 2012;

3) in more than one thousand instances, people with HIV faced charges under HIV-specific statutes in the United States and these charges are not based on science;

4) syringe exchange prevents the transmission of HIV and there is a federal ban on syringe exchange programs!

I had an opportunity to attend a visual journaling class the Sunday after AIDSWatch 2015. I wanted to make sure that my collage pages reflected hope, with power, truth, and a clear civil rights message. We were led in meditation by our leader and then each of us began searching what would manifest our goals for the art we were creating.

I immediately found a magazine that had nine southern states as part of a beautiful graphic and I knew that was mine! One other page included the statistic “1 in 5,” and yet another page had young people at the microphone. My collage page for my journal was to tell the story of AIDSWatch with hope and determination. I have experienced so much profound joy on my journey, so the words “Experience Joy” dominate the top of my page.

In 2015, HIV is still a disease of disparities. We know and believe that health care is a human right. I was drawn to Twitter during our Monday morning forum at AIDSWatch, and found myself typing these words:

”We are HUMAN GEOGRAPHY! That means as constituents our words matter, our words are paramount, our words save lives!”

Race matters. African-Americans account for one half of all new infections. How can black women living with HIV get quality care if it is not mandated that providers, AIDS service organizations, clinicians, and public health departments get anti-racism training? We need to ask questions like: Are the Southern Poverty Law Center and the NAACP training and sending out attorneys to help in each of the nine southern states that are now the epicenter of the AIDS epidemic in America? Who is standing up for transgender women? Who is standing with and fighting for the end of discrimination against LGBTQ youth?

“One ounce of truth benefits like ripples of a pond.” We had so much truth to tell on Capitol Hill. The stigma is so great in nine southern states that many get an AIDS diagnosis on their first visit to a clinic. Where are the leaders from faith communities? Thirty four years into this epidemic we are still asking, “Where are our allies?”

What kind of truth would I tell our Senators and Representatives from Pennsylvania? I decided I had to speak about syringe exchange and comprehensive sex education. Young people in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, can get $3.00 bags of heroin in rural areas and are desperate for a needle exchange program. Congress must end the federal ban on syringe exchange programs in the fiscal year 2015.

As a teacher, I have tried to share bold truth for years, regarding comprehensive sex education. One of our big “asks” as we spoke to the staffers of our Senators and Representatives was to eliminate the federal abstinence-only programs. They have never worked. Some seventh graders have openly stated that they have already had sex with three partners. They are desperate for truth from us. They are so valuable, so precious. Condoms need to be available in high schools. This is where I reiterate, “Young people under the age of twenty-five are twenty per cent of the new HIV infections each year.”

This work is arduous. As I look at my visual journal, I see that I included phrases like, “Follow your dreams,” “Feed your soul,” and “Seek adventure and respect each other. “ My dream has no fairy tale ending; rather it has an ending so bold that it’s happening as I write.

We, the people with HIV and AIDS, will end this epidemic. We are intrepid. HIV is not a crime. The Pennsylvania team spoke about Barbara Lee’s bill, the HR 1586 and asked our representatives to co-sponsor this bill, the REPEAL HIV Discrimination Act, because HIV criminal laws are often based on long-outdated and inaccurate beliefs rather than science. We had to explain to one staffer that if your viral load is undetectable it is not possible for another person to get HIV from you. What will you get from me? You will get authentic, bold, unrelenting truth!

The HIV epidemic is primarily an epidemic of women of color. We are waging a fierce civil and human rights battle! This is where I quote Nikki Giovanni once more: “For awhile progress was being made . . . then . . . hammerskjold was killed, lumumba was killed, and diem was killed, and malcolm was killed, and evers was killed, and shwerner, goodman, and chaney were killed, and liuzzo was killed, and stokely fled the country, and leroi was arrested, and rap was arrested . . .”

It is not OK that people still die of this disease! It is not OK that stigma exists and keeps people from being tested! It is not OK that children’s lives are lost because we don’t have comprehensive sex education in schools. It is not OK that there is a federal ban on syringe exchange. It would be worse if there had been no AIDSWatch 2015.

We, the activists and advocates, spoke mightily on Capitol Hill. On April 13, and April 14, 2015, we hope we spoke words so powerful that they may still be reverberating. Our work is unfinished. As Elizabeth Taylor once said, “We must win for the sake of all humanity.”

Susan Mull is a PWN-USA member, poet, writer, educator, and longtime activist based in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

*All quotes from Nikki Giovanni’s poetry are from the book Selected Poems of Nikki Giovanni.

Show Your Love! Invest in Women’s Leadership Today!

Dear Friend,

Far too often, women living with HIV are talked about, instead of talked to, at the tables where decisions are made about our lives.

PWN-USA’s mission is to shift that balance: to prepare and involve all women living with HIV, in all our diversity, including gender identity and sexual expression, to be at those decision-making tables.

This fall, we’ll take a huge step towards living that mission by hosting a national leadership summit for women with HIV. Can you help us take this step?

woman under a sign reading "welcome womyn leaders"In March 2012, Positive Women’s Network – USA held our first-ever Summit to build advocacy skills and leadership capacity among 50 women living with HIV from the U.S. South. Following the Summit, participants reported they were better prepared to engage in policy discussions about topics ranging from HIV criminalization to Affordable Care Act implementation.  Over a third of Summit attendees went on to attend the International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. For most, it was their first-ever International AIDS Conference.

This year, Positive Women’s Network – USA (PWN-USA) is building on that success.  We are thrilled to announce SPEAK UP! A National Summit for Women Living with HIV! 200 women living with HIV from across the United States will gather in Fort Walton Beach, FL, from September 17-19, 2014. We invite you to help make this historic event a reality.

Positive Women’s Network – USA believes that investing in our own leadership is important, and that building advocacy capacity in our communities is critical to achieving policies that uphold women’s rights. Participants will cover and arrange their own travel expenses to the Summit; but we are committed to making the Summit accessible to women, regardless of income level. Can you take part in expanding the leadership circle of women living with HIV?

pwn-usa leaders joyfully toting event supplies$60,000 is what it will take to provide food, lodging, and the best quality content for 200 women with HIV at the Summit. Today, we are calling on members, supporters, allies and change-makers like you to join us in raising part of that goal: $10,000 in individual donations by Mother’s Day! Your donation toward that goal will be doubled through a matching grant! 

During the Summit, women living with HIV will build leadership skills, discuss timely policy, legal and research trends relevant to women’s lives, and strategize to support organizing and advocacy at a federal and state level. Read on to find out how you can support the small parts that comprise this huge vision — and remember, your gift will be doubled.

We’ll train advocates in community organizing, maximizing media opportunities, understanding data and surveillance, using a human rights analysis, research advocacy, advocating for Medicaid expansion, ending HIV criminalization, talking to legislators, and more! Each participant will receive valuable materials to add to her advocacy library to support her work.

hand-drawn workshop learning tools$20 secures that packet of materials for one attendee

$40 funds a participant’s meals for one day of the Summit

$75 supports a registration scholarship for one leader

$150 pays for a leader’s lodging for the entire duration of the Summit

$500 helps us provide childcare, so that attendees with young families can be at the table

$750 will support a day’s audiovisual costs, to make Speak Up! A National Summit for Women Living with HIV a rich multimedia learning experience

Giving any of the amounts above is a significant contribution to women’s leadership! Show your love for women with HIV by taking a bold step with us toward our goal: $10,000 in matched donations by PWN-USA’s birthday, June 17! 

Sponsorships are also available.  Sponsors will be acknowledged on program materials and on PWN-USA’s website — and these gifts will also be doubled! Details follow:

$5,000 Sister Circle

  • Name and logo will be included in Summit program
  • Name and logo will be included on Summit webpage
  • Will be acknowledged during Summit
  • Opportunity to share materials on a table or in resources folder
  • Will be acknowledged in Summit report

$2,500 Solidarity Circle

  • Name and logo will be included in Summit program
  • Name and logo will be included on Summit webpage
  • Opportunity to share materials on a table or in resources folder

$1,000 Ally Circle

  • Name will be included on Summit webpage
  • Opportunity to share materials on a table or in resources folder

Invest in women leaders living with HIV! Donate online or by mail.

Click this link to donate online toward our matching goal; select the amount you want to donate, and then select “Support for National Summit” from the drop-down menu.

To donate by mail, make checks payable to Movement Strategy Center (memo line: PWN-USA) and send them directly to:

Positive Women’s Network – USA
c/o Movement Strategy Center
436 14th Street, 5th Floor
Oakland, CA 94612

Thank you for your support!leaders_group

In Sisterhood and Solidarity,
Positive Women’s Network – USA

PWN-USA’s 2014 – 2016 Strategic Plan

Every day, PWN-USA inspires, informs and mobilizes women living with HIV to advocate for changes that improve our lives and uphold our rights.  In 2013, we went through an extensive strategic planning process and listened to hundreds of stakeholders.  Over 200 women living with HIV contributed to our newly launched vision, values, and goals.  Check out our strategic plan today!

Print

Community Organizing 101: Collective Solutions build Collective Power

By Naina Khanna – Community Organizing is a long-term approach to achieving social change through collective action by changing the balance of power. In the process, the people most affected by an issue are supported to identify a problem and take action to achieve solutions.  Let’s walk through an example.

You have recently seen that Sunshine Hospital, the main provider of HIV care to uninsured patients in your county, is taking longer to schedule appointments and return phone calls. Because of this, patients are not getting the care they need and may stop seeing their provider.

Step 1. Form a core group of people affected by the issue. For example, recruit people you have heard complain and ask them to bring others.

Step 2. Identify and agree upon an issue. An issue is a full or partial solution to a problem.  At the first meeting, have people share information about what is happening. One person in the meeting shares that her friend on the hospital’s advisory board mentioned 4 social worker positions have been cut.

Some criteria for choosing your issue. The issue should: 
Be widely and deeply felt: that is, felt by many people in your constituency, and be a “gut” issue –  something that people know in both their heads and hearts is wrong.  You want to move people to action.
Be easy to understand – it should make sense!
Have a clear target and timeframe
Set you up for the next campaign – you want to come out of this with more power, people, allies… and maybe even more money to organize in the future!

The group decides in this case that the staffing cut is an issue because 1 social worker cannot serve 200 HIV+ patients.

Stay tuned for Community Organizing 101: How to Run a Meeting continued in the next issue of our newsletter.