The Evolution of HIV Stigma: An Interview with PWN-USA’s Board Chair Barb Cardell, from the Atlas Newsletter

The Evolution of HIV Stigma: An Interview with PWN-USA’s Board Chair Barb Cardell, from the Atlas Newsletter

Reposted from the Atlas Newsletter’s website

“HIV stigma has been prevalent since the virus’ outbreak in the 1980s. While decades of medical advances have changed the scientific reality of HIV, stigma remains widespread. So what does HIV stigma look like today compared to 30 years ago? Barb Cardell, Board Chair of the Positive Women’s Network and HIV advocate, sat down with BCAP to shed light on the evolution of HIV stigma. As a woman living with HIV, Barb shared her own experiences and how she believes people can change the reality of HIV stigma.

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One thought on “The Evolution of HIV Stigma: An Interview with PWN-USA’s Board Chair Barb Cardell, from the Atlas Newsletter

  1. Unfortunately, as far as I can tell, all of us who have been diagnosed with the HIV virus within the past 30+ years have experienced perceived, actual and internalized stigma as a part of living with this disease. Knowing or hearing the reaction that people have toward those thought to be the victors of all stds in general, and having heard the tone of the comments made about women who contract an infection, we tend to live with the fear of rejection, shunning, and blame, as we fall further from the grace given by humans, both male and female into the pit of dirt and shame. We can’t hold the babies, we can’t cook the food, get the job, or rent the apartment that is too close to the self righteous, ignorant and clean. We often begin to feel that they are right. We have been careless , sinful, and just generally wrong. We may spend years feeling less than. My hope is that with education and introspection, and yes compassion, we can help the newly diagnosed, as well as those just too afraid to test, move on more easily to physic and emotional health, longevity and a well full filled life without shame. The Christians among us are reminded that we have All fallen short of the glory of GOD; our greatest commission is to love one another as we have been loved, and that we cannot be forgiven if we cannot forgive.
    Loren Jones/Berkeley, Ca.

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